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Pete Wells Awards Chaiwali One Star

Pete Wells Awards Chaiwali One Star



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Despite the low key profile of Chaiwali, the year old Indian restaurant that occupies the first two floors of a brownstone in Harlem, it has charmed its way into a deservedly good review from Pete Wells. The owner, who is also the chef, decorator, and occupant of the brownstone's upper stories, has created a unique eatery that Wells explains as having, “its own way of looking at the world,” and continues to speculate that the owner, Ms. Trehan, “seems to have built the restaurant on the belief that the things she likes will make the rest of us happy, too. You see this in eccentric bits of decoration, like the stuffed peacock that perches on the upstairs bar… there’s also a taxidermied antelope head and a flamboyant mural of a tigress and butterflies.”

He says this in an endearing way, one that commends the ability of Ms. Trehan to establish a restaurant that feels like home — one that isn't stuck up or pretentious. He contends that, “The menu feels personal, too. It reminds me of the relaxed, light-handed, modern food that Americans with roots in India, like Ms. Trehan, may cook at home.” Her eatery — from the food to the décor — is genuine. Wells made it clear that though, “her recipes probably aren’t her grandmother’s, but she pays attention to the quality and balance of saffron, fenugreek, ginger and coriander.” In other words, the food she serves hasn't been altered to appease the masses, who may rather more elaborate platting and styling of the food.

Ms. Trehan's menu is primarily praised by Wells, who begins the acclaim with the samosas which had a “potato-pea filling with a decidedly peppery bite,” seeing it as, “a treat to find samosa wrappers as thin and greaseless as these in a restaurant.” He imagines how her cooking would evolve with the seasons saying that in the winter, “the first course could be Chaiwali’s silky carrot soup, intensely flavored with saffron and a few fried curry leaves that float on the surface. In summer, maybe the appetizer would be the Goa shrimp ceviche, sweetened with little cubes of mango...” Wells had particular admiration for the chef's vindaloo lamb chops stating that, “Chaiwali makes vindaloo with complexity and nuance, nothing like the aggro-curry the color of a rusted tailpipe served in generic Indian restaurants.”

Though Wells' review was mainly positive, dishes like the black pepper chicken and the okra fries didn't fare well. He wouldn't again order the Desi pasta, which changes nightly, but would rather “the clever veggie burger, a tall fritter of kale pakora with avocado, lettuce and tomato on a bun, made a more appealing meatless dinner.”

Check out a chef's guide to Indian desserts.

As for the desserts, Wells says that they “find a happy medium between too basic and too complicated.” Going on to say that the “Alice’s Jamaican rum and biscuit pudding tastes something like a tiramisù spiked with booze” and that surprisingly, the dessert that actually scared him the most was his favorite, the curry cumin cookies. He says that “these little ginger-spiked bites, crumbly like shortbreads, are refreshing and bright, with a black pepper finish that took me by surprise in the best way.” To wrap up, Wells strongly suggests you order a cup of chai, as the chai at Chaiwali isn't “the lukewarm broth of dirty milk in a paper cup that you get in coffee shops,” but rather a “potent mocha-colored drink, like a cortado made with strong black tea and spices.”

For the complete review, click here.


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

Want the ultimate dish on the latest celebrity food news, plus exclusive recipes, videos and more? Click here to subscribe to the People Food newsletter.

“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


David Chang Says He Read 'Every Bit of Criticism' About His Netflix Series Ugly Delicious: 'We Did Our Best'

The Momofuku chef addressed concerns over its lack of representation of women and African Americans.

Chef David Chang always wants to make everything better.

“I’m not the happiest person,” Chang said. “I could have the best day in the world but I could be like ‘Oh, we could do this better.&apos”

During a recent interview at Recode’s Code Conference the Momofuku Restaurant Group founder shared how that philosophy has impacted all of his business projects. While Netflix food series Ugly Delicious won a Webby Special Achievement Award for Special Achievement for 𠇋ringing nuanced conversations on food, authenticity, and culture to the Internet,” it has also received some backlash over its lack of representation of women and African Americans in the culinary industry.

“I’ve read every bit of criticism about that TV show, just like I read every review, because it just kills me when anyone has a bad time,” Chang said. “So, yes, I’ve read every criticism—whether it wasn’t inclusive enough through African Americans or through women—I just know that we had one season, and we did our best, and we had no intention of trying to be exclusive. Hopefully there’s a second season, and we’ll be able to do it better.

As a restauranteur, Chang said he genuinely applies criticisms to his improvement projects rather than letting them roll off his back. In May 2016, New York Times food critic Pete Wells visited Momofuku Nishi, one of Chang’s many restaurants, and gave it a one-star review. Wells called the signature dish, the Cacio e Pepe, “lukewarm” and said “I don’t know why this dish exists, except to find a use for a proprietary Momofuku product.”

“I had never gotten a bad review ever until Pete Wells destroyed a restaurant that I continue to talk about,” Chang said. “I’m sure people at Momofuku are like ‘Why is he bringing it up again?’ but because I’ve learned so much from it. That medicine tasted terrible, but I think it really helped us to re-evaluate what we needed to do—where we needed to go𠅊nd quite frankly I think all of our restaurants around the world are doing better than ever before because of that review. So I hate to give it to the New York Times and Pete Wells, but I am weirdly thankful for that.”

During the interview, Chang also addressed the #MeToo movement and the recent sexual harassment allegations that have been plaguing the industry, citing Eater’s most recent reports about Mario Batali, in which women came forward alleging that he groped them while they were taking photos.

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“It’s not just disheartening. You’re like… Jesus Christ, this is so hard to read,” Chang said. �use simultaneously, I don’t know if we would be in business today without Mario’s support. So I feel obligated to recognize that, but also, like, what do I do with the opportunities I have now? And the only thing I think I can do with the platform that we have, is to be the best-in-class business with the most thoughtful, forward-thinking culture, knowing that we’re never going to be perfect. But that’s always been our goal.”


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