Cocktail Recipes, Spirits, and Local Bars

Fish Cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce

Fish Cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound 1-inch-thick halibut fillets
  • 1 cup chopped green onions
  • 3 drained canned sardines, chopped (about 2 tablespoons)
  • 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • 2 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
  • 2 1/2 cups fresh breadcrumbs made from crustless French bread
  • Caper-Parsley Sauce (click for recipe)

Recipe Preparation

  • Sprinkle halibut fillets with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add halibut fillets and sauté until just opaque in center, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to plate; cool. Wipe skillet with paper towels.

  • Flake halibut fillets into large bowl. Mix in green onions, sardines, chopped fresh parsley, flour, garlic, and lemon peel. Mix in 1 cup breadcrumbs. Season with salt and pepper; mix in egg. Shape into six 3-inch-diameter cakes. Transfer remaining 1 1/2 cups breadcrumbs to bowl. Coat fish cakes with breadcrumbs, pressing to adhere.

  • Heat remaining 4 tablespoons oil in reserved skillet over medium-high heat. Add fish cakes and cook until brown and crisp, about 6 minutes per side. Transfer to plates; serve fish cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce.

Recipe by Snjezana HercigonjaReviews Section

Simple Lemon Caper Sauce

Lemons and capers go together really well. And butter makes everything better, usually. Bringing the three ingredients into this easy sauce offers a delicious finishing touch for simple preparations such as baked, grilled, or broiled fish, shrimp, or chicken. This quick weeknight lemon caper sauce isn't fancy, but it somehow makes even the most basic turkey or veal cutlets, or baked chicken or tuna, feel a little bit more special. It comes together in a flash, using ingredients you may already have on hand.

However, if you've never had capers, most supermarkets will have them. They are the unopened flower buds of the caper bush, and they bring a tangy, floral, and almost briny or salty taste to whatever they're paired with. They're sold in small jars and can usually be found in the grocery store near other condiments or sometimes with specialty Italian ingredients, depending on the store.

Capers can be rinsed (or not) before using, depending on the recipe specifications, and need to be stored in the fridge once the jar is opened. They happen to pair especially well with chicken (think chicken piccata), and can completely transform the most basic of salmon dishes. They appear a lot in Italian cooking and also are great with other kinds of pasta dishes and pickled with other foods. They're dark green and some people say they taste a little like green olives if you're in a pinch, you can substitute one for the other.

The recipe makes enough sauce for about four generous servings, and it can be scaled up to serve more.


Parsley recipes

Parsley adds fresh flavour to sauces, salsas and pestos, and can be used as a garnish. Check out our recipes using parsley, from tabbouleh to pasta dishes.

Gnocchi with parsley, butter & samphire

Pass on the pasta and try making your own potato gnocchi - forage for samphire to make a fresh and frugal meat-free main

Egg & parsley salad with watercress dressing

A picnic's not a picnic without a boiled egg or two. Serve them in a salad with parsley, shallots, our watercress dressing and a sprinkling of chilli salt

Green bean parsley pesto gnocchi

Whizz up your own parsley, lemon and cashew nut pesto to coat gnocchi and green beans in this 13-minute supper, that's ideal for busy weeknights

Tuna & caper orzo with parsley

Use capers, orzo, chilli and cherry tomatoes to make tuna pasta more exciting – and you may already have tuna and capers in the storecupboard

Brown rice tabbouleh with eggs & parsley

Pack up this tasty rice salad for a healthy vegetarian lunch. It's full of fibre, folate and vitamin C and is topped with protein-rich boiled eggs

Parsley & caper salad

Serve this easy salad as a side dish to summer barbecues. Parsley, shallot and capers make it more than an average salad and it pairs well with cooked meats

Beef salad with caper & parsley dressing

A perfect no-fuss meal for friends with a flavoursome dressing

Chicken, leek & parsley pie

This satisfying evening meal can be made in advance: simply make up the pie and freeze until you are ready to bake it

Baked salmon fillet with pickled cranberries, parsley & pistachios

Balance out an oily fish, such as salmon, with homemade pickled cranberries. They also add a fun, Christmassy feel to the dish

Crab linguine with chilli & parsley

Keep it simple with this restaurant-style dish that takes a few good-quality ingredients and lets them shine

Roasted red pepper & parsley pesto with penne

Try a new take on pesto and blend red peppers, cashew nuts and parsley then serve spooned through hot pasta

Lemon & parsley butter beans

Give your meal a Mediterranean twist with this zesty, low-fat side dish

Salsa verde (green sauce)

Try our delicious salsa verde recipe with tarragon, parsley, capers and wild garlic. This herby green sauce is perfect with traditional roast chicken and fish


Recipe Summary

  • 4 (6 ounce) skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • ½ cup white wine
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons capers
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Place each chicken breast between 2 sheets of heavy-duty plastic wrap. Pound breasts to 1/2-inch thickness using a meat mallet or small heavy skillet.

Spread flour into a wide, shallow dish. Press chicken into flour to coat completely.

Melt butter with olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat cook chicken in hot butter mixture until no longer pink in the center and the juices run clear, 3 to 5 minutes per side. Remove chicken from skillet to a serving platter and cover with a lid to keep warm.

Pour white wine, lemon juice, capers, and garlic into the pan. Bring the liquid to a boil while scraping the browned bits of food from the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon cook at a boil until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Season the mixture with salt and pepper.


Preheat the broiler. Brush the fish lightly on both sides with 1 T olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place the fish on a small wire rack set inside an ovenproof dish. Broil 4" from heat source for 4 minutes. Carefully turn the fish over and cook another 4 minutes.

Meanwhile, combine the remaining oil, lemon juice, garlic, capers and lemon zest in a small saucepan. Place over low heat and cook, swirling the pan, for 2 - 3 minutes to heat through.

Stir in the parsley. Place the swordfish on dinner plates and spoon the sauce on top. Serve immediately.


Fish Cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce - Recipes

Sardines suffer from a bad rep for the most part.

So many of us have stinky memories of those tiny, pungent fish lurking inside pull-tab tins that our parents or grand-parents forced upon us.

But I’m here to plead with you to give sardines a chance.

At a time when so many other seafood species are on the verge of extinction, sardines are one of the most sustainable fish around. They’re super cheap, and loaded with good-for-you omega-3s, too.

That’s why a local group, whimsically named the “Sardinistas,” is waging a campaign to get you and me to better appreciate this much-maligned fish. Find out more about this group by reading my story in the November issue of San Francisco magazine.

Bay Area chefs already have courted a love affair with sardines. Find fresh ones grilled on many a menu here, their flesh silky and smoky tasting.

Fresh sardines aren’t always easy to come by at local fish markets, though, because the majority caught in Monterey Bay are exported elsewhere.

But canned ones are easily found at any supermarket.

And even die-hard sardine haters are sure to love them in “Fish Cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce.”

The recipe, adapted from one published in Gourmet magazine seven years ago, actually has three types of fish in it. And two of them are despised by a good number of folks. Yes, one is the sardine. The other? Anchovy.

But hear me out before you pass judgment.

Although the recipe calls for three canned sardines, I used the entire can, just for good measure. The sardines are chopped up and mixed with flaked, fresh halibut, along with copious amounts of green onion, lemon, parsley and bread crumbs. The mixture gets formed into round cakes that are seared until crispy. They’re served with a punchy sauce of pureed capers, parsley, lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, and — yes — anchovies.

The result is a really flavorful, much more complex fish cake — that doesn’t taste “fishy” at all — with a sauce so wonderfully tangy, salty, and assertive that you’ll want to drizzle it on and on.

Serve it as a first course, light lunch, or dinner with salad and crusty bread. Indeed, the fish cake and sauce would make one mighty fine sandwich, too.

There you have it: Three types of sustainable fish in one dish that’s sure to do a body good.

Fish Cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce

1 pound 1-inch-thick halibut fillets

1 cup chopped green onions

1 (4.375-ounce) tin of skinless, boneless sardines packed in oil, drained and chopped

3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

2 large garlic cloves, chopped

1 1/2 teaspoons grated lemon peel

2 1/2 cups fresh breadcrumbs made from crustless French bread, divided use

Caper-Parsley Sauce (recipe follows)

Sprinkle halibut fillets with salt and pepper. Heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add halibut fillets and saute until just opaque in center, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to plate cool. Wipe skillet with paper towels.

Flake halibut fillets into large bowl. Mix in green onions, sardines, chopped fresh parsley, flour, garlic and lemon peel. Mix in 1 cup breadcrumbs. Season with salt and pepper mix in one egg. If mixture doesn’t seem to be holding together when you try to form a cake, mix in one more egg. Shape mixture into six 3-inch-diameter cakes. Transfer remaining 1 1/2 cups breadcrumbs to a bowl. Coat fish cakes with breadcrumbs, pressing to adhere.

Heat remaining 4 tablespoons oil in reserved skillet over medium-high heat. Add fish cakes and cook until brown and crisp, about 6 minutes per side. Transfer to plates serve fish cakes with Caper-Parsley Sauce.

Adapted from Gourmet, March 2002

Caper-Parsley Sauce

6 tablespoons drained capers

6 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley

6 anchovy fillets, chopped

2 large garlic cloves, halved

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until a coarse puree forms. Season sauce with salt and pepper. Transfer to a bowl. (Can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and chill. Bring to room temperature before serving.)

Note: The sauce also can be used on roast beef, hard-boiled eggs or potato salad.

From Bon Appetit, February 2002


More: Try another strong-tasting, sustainable fish — salted mackerel — in Steamed Pork Cake (hom yu jing jiu yok bang)


Southwestern Corn Salad

Make this salad a day ahead so the ingredients can marinate.

6 ears fresh corn on the cob
1/2 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
1 cup finely chopped green onions
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon honey or agave syrup
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 poblano peppers, chopped

Remove the corn from the cobs and place into a large bowl. Add remaining ingredients and toss well.


27 Delicious Feast of Seven Fishes Recipes to Share With Your Family

You may want to make more than seven for the ultimate Italian Christmas eve menu.

The Feast of Seven Fishes is an Italian-American Christmas Eve tradition celebrated with seven seafood dishes, or seven kinds of seafood (but sometimes more, because, why not celebrate with abbondanza?), ranging from tasty appetizers to sides to main dishes. The type of pesce served varies depending on who you talk to but cod, calamari, and shellfish are popular.

Despite its popularity in America, Feast of Seven Fishes recipes are unknown to many Italians. This particular tradition of celebrating on Christmas Eve with a meat-free meal composed of multiple seafood dishes is Italian-American in origin, and has roots in the Roman Catholic tradition of abstaining from meat before the midnight birth of baby Jesus (and following feast day). And though the Feast of Seven Fishes seems to indicate that you must serve seven dishes, that's actually not the case: Many families might also celebrate with other numbers of dishes (usually up to 13).

However you celebrate, it's a delicious spread, and well worth indulging in. After all, there's plenty of time for ham and Christmas cookies on Christmas day!